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Easy DIY Lego Table With Storage

Learn how to make an easy DIY Lego table with storage! This project doesn’t require a lot of tools or skill and can be made in a weekend. Let me show you how!

How to make an easy DIY Lego table with storage

This is the second Lego table I’ve made—and it’s based on some feedback I received from a few people following the DIY Lego and art activity table I made for Ramona’s 2nd birthday. The feedback? It’s too damn complicated. LOL.

The table I made for Ramona was one of the most frustrating builds I’ve done yet, and that’s because it had a lot of small precision cuts to get everything to fit just so. I was determined to make exactly what I wanted, though: something with inset storage and something with a reversible topper. 

And the reversible topper had to sit flush down with the table’s frame so it could be a functioning table with a flat top for drawing/coloring or whatever else when it wasn’t being used for Legos. But this table is going to be just for Legos, so it’s a bit more straightforward.

It also isn’t really a build as much as it is a DIY. It’s an easy DIY Lego table for my cousin’s baby who is turning 1. We wanted to give him something that was down on his level but that he could grow into. He is walking now, so a play table seems like a great next step!

There is some pocket hole joinery in the construction of the table because I wanted to add a storage space under the table, but it isn’t complicated. And you could do it without pocket hole joinery if you wanted. So here’s what I used for this DIY Lego table.

finished easy DIY lego table
toddler playing with the finished easy DIY lego table

Supplies

Lumber:

  • (1) piece of ¾” by 24” by 24” MDF or plywood (2 ft by 2 ft square)
  • (1) piece of 1/4” by by 13 1/2″ by 15″ (actual: 1/4” by 13 1/2″ by 15″)
  • (2) pieces of 1” by 13 1/2″ by 8″ (actual: 3/4” by 13 1/2″ by 8″)

Tools:

Additional supplies:

And here’s how I made my easy DIY Lego table!

(Safety first! Remember to wear a mask and eye protection while cutting and sanding wood. Do not use any tools without proper training, precautions, and/or supervision. Read my full terms of use here.)

Step 1: Prep the DIY Lego table top

Originally I bought a piece of 24″ by 24″ plywood because it was the size I wanted to base the entire table around. That meant that I didn’t have to do any cutting. I did, however, need to do some sanding—and a lot of it.

I first used my orbital sander and medium-grit sandpaper to thoroughly sand down all of the raised grain and rough spots on the top and bottom of the plywood. Then I switched to fine-grit sandpaper to smooth everything out and break down the rough edges. 

If you want to use edge banding for this table, go ahead and apply that now using an iron. (I used veneer edge banding on the kids’ desk chair I made Ramona—see that post for tips.) To finish the table top, I filled the big holes in the plywood edging with wood filler.

I took a putty knife and wood filler and spread a thin layer all around the sides. This helped even things out a ton. After that dried, I sanded a bit by hand. You might need to touch up a few spots. 

Paint and finish as desired—I used primer and some leftover latex paint we had in the storage closet. Then I gave the top and sides a few coats of my favorite water-based polyurethane in matte.

For some projects with pretty exposed plywood edging, check out my indoor cat house side table build plans, my modern indoor floor planter with hairpin legs, and my simple mid-century mod plant stand.

bottom of the DIY lego table
bottom of the DIY lego table

…And then I nixed the plywood top 🙁

And then after all of that work? I ditched the piece. It was hard to do, because I put so much work into making it look nice. But it warped so badly that you could see the curve. And it was super uneven when I put the legs on. Ugh. I decided to put the piece in the garage and hopefully use it for something else.

Instead, I picked up a piece of 2 foot by 4 foot 3/4″ thick MDF and cut that in half. This luckily didn’t need any patching or filling. I just needed to gently sand the sides. Then I primed and painted it. MDF is much less resistant to warping.

This project also gave us a chance to try out our new Kreg Accu-Cut XL (gifted to us from Kreg), which we were extremely impressed with. My dad had actually used this before he knew we got one, and he loves his, too. He used it to do all of the cuts for his DIY murphy bed.

This neat tool is basically a circular saw guide that gives you perfect cuts up to 100″ using the extenders. I hate using circular saws because my hands aren’t super steady and I have a hard time getting perfectly straight cuts. So the Accut-Cut XL will definitely be a nice addition to our shop!

using the Kreg accu-cut and a circular saw to cut the tabletop for a DIY lego table
Kreg accu-cut logo
using the Kreg accu-cut and a circular saw to cut the tabletop for a DIY lego table
using the Kreg accu-cut and a circular saw to cut the tabletop for a DIY lego table
using the Kreg accu-cut and a circular saw to cut the tabletop for a DIY lego table
using the Kreg accu-cut and a circular saw to cut the tabletop for a DIY lego table
painted lego table top

Step 2: Cut and prep pieces for the storage bin holder

Now for the storage. I wanted a space underneath the table to store Legos up and off the floor. So I created a simple box to hold a storage bin. I did this using two pieces of 3/4″ plywood measuring 13 1/2″ by 8″ for the sides and one piece of 1/4″ MDF measuring 13 1/2″ by 15″ for the bottom.

These measurements were based around the specific storage bin I got at Target. You can change them if you want to use a different storage bin—just measure and plan accordingly. You can also ditch the storage bin entirely if you want, but I love having things up and off the floor.

I then gave each of the side pieces a coat of primer and painted them. I did this before assembling everything under the table just because I thought it would be easier. You can attach your pieces and then paint them. Whatever works best for you.

To attach the storage bin holder, I drilled pocket holes on the inside-top of each of the side pieces. Then I measured, marked, and attached them to the bottom of the table using wood glue and pocket hole screws. For the bottom of the storage bin holder, I ran wood glue along the bottom of the side pieces and then screwed the bottom piece in place. Then finished painting.

showing how the storage area attaches to the bottom of the table
showing how the storage area attaches to the bottom of the table
showing how the storage area attaches to the bottom of the table using pocket holes

Step 3: Attach legs

I went with a simple already-finished set of four 16” coffee table legs for this table. I measured Ramona’s play table that we got off Amazon and figured the DIY Lego table should be about that height. So these legs worked perfectly and were simple to install!

Heads up, it’s in the description, but I of course missed it. The metal base plates don’t come with the legs. I ordered some 11-degree angled leg mounting plates off Amazon, and they worked perfectly. You can use angled or straight plates for these.

base plates attached to the bottom of the table for the legs
base plate for legs
threaded screw on the end of the leg
finished easy DIY Lego table
storage bin for legos

Step 5: Attach Lego base plates

These come with a very stick adhesive backing, so you won’t need any glue. I used all four base plates for the table. These are very easy to cut with a miter saw if you need to. (I cut them for the Lego table I made Ramona a few years ago.) They work perfectly with name-brand and off-brand Duplo-style Legos.

creative QT peel and stick baseplates for duplos
finished easy DIY Lego table

Finished DIY Lego table!

And that’s it! A cute and easy Lego table. I won’t say it was cheap—it would definitely be cheaper to go with an Ikea Lack side table and throw some base plates on it. But I wanted to make something a bit more customized for a family member. Plus it has storage!

Keep in mind that this is pretty low to the ground, so perfect for the littler ones. It’s design to be stood at while playing, so I’m not worried about the storage bin area interfering with leg room. I don’t know if you’ve met a toddler, but they don’t sit still. Ramona is usually always standing and playing at her play tables!

So keep height in mind if you’re making this. Take some measurements and map it out in person to help you visualize it before you order legs. If these are too short, you can always find some longer legs. And if you want to use chairs, you can nix the storage bin area or make it smaller for a smaller bin. Good luck!

finished easy DIY Lego table
finished easy DIY Lego table
bin with legos in them
toddler playing with the finished DIY lego table
toddler playing with the finished DIY lego table

Pin my easy DIY Lego table with storage project!

pinnable graphic with photos of a DIY Lego table and text overlay about how to make one
pinnable graphic with photos of a DIY Lego table and text overlay about how to make one
pinnable graphic with photos of a DIY Lego table and text overlay about how to make one
pinnable graphic with photos of a DIY Lego table and text overlay about how to make one
pinnable graphic with photos of a DIY Lego table and text overlay about how to make one
pinnable graphic with photos of a DIY Lego table and text overlay about how to make one

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