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18 Sansevieria Varieties I’ve Owned

This post shares a photo list of 18 sansevieria varieties I’ve owned and cared for. I hope it helps you to identify what type of snake plant you have!

Photo IDs of 18 different sansevieria varieties

Hey all! This post actually used to be part of my full snake plant care guide post, but I got some feedback that it was too long. So I ended up splitting it into its own post.

The purpose of this post is to share photos and descriptions of 18 different sansevieria varieties I’ve owned and cared for. It can be overwhelming figuring out what kind of plant you have, and I’m hoping this helps!

Snake plant background

So as a disclaimer first and foremost, I have to note the difference in names you might encounter. Sansevieria plants are generally referred to as “snake plants.”

However, most snake plants—or sansevieria plants—were reclassified to the genus dracaena in 2017. As you can image, it will likely take quite some time for people to stop referring to snake plants as sansevieria plants. If they ever do 🙂

So this is just a heads up that I will be referring to the plants as sansevieria plants throughout this post. Why? Because it’s what you’ll see them labeled at in stores and nurseries.

Trifasciata variety of snake plant in a large white pot

What are the different sansevieria varieties? Here are 18 with photos!

There are many different snake plant species—about 70, in fact. Some snake plants are dark green with whitish stripes—both vertical and horizontal—while others have yellow edges or a red tint. Some are lighter green, while others are quite dark. “Twist” varieties have twisted leaves. 

Depending on the variety, snake plants can grow up to several feet tall. I prefer the darker varieties of snake plants for that reason. The yellow-edge, red-tinted, and twisted varieties tend to not grow as tall. Here are a few different snake plant varieties you’ll likely encounter.

sansevieria moonshine in a black pot

1. Sansevieria trifasciata variety ID pics

The regular ol’ trifasciata variety is what you’re most likely to find when you’re out and about. It has dark green leaves with a lighter green or even gray-whiteish variegation on the leaves. The leaves are tall and thin, and the plants can get pretty large. Check out a few trifasciata plants I’ve got in my house.

Trifasciata snake plant variety ID pics
Trifasciata snake plant variety ID pics
Trifasciata snake plant and pothos in a pot on a partio

2. Trifasciata robusta variety ID pics

Trifasciata also has a “robusta” variety. This type of snake plant has pretty much the same markings as the regular trifasciata, but its leaves are larger. They are wider and chunkier—I love the look.

Trifasciata robusta plant
Trifasciata robusta plant

3. Trifasciata Laurentii variety ID pics

Trifasciata Laurentii is another variety you’ll likely find pretty easily. You’ll know it because it looks a lot like the regular trifasciata, but it has yellow edges. It also grows tall and thin, and the leaves aren’t wide like the trifasciata robusta variety.

Trifasciata Laurentii snake plant
Trifasciata Laurentii snake plant
Trifasciata Laurentii snake plant

4. Trifasciata black coral variety ID pics

Trifasciata black coral is a gorgeous variety I’ve been trying to get my hands on for a while! I saw this one at a local nursery, but it was too big for me to take home (and a bit pricey). This variety grows to about 3 feet tall, and the dark green leaves have grayish-white horizontal “stripes.”

Trifasciata black coral
Trifasciata black coral

5. Trifasciata Whitney variety ID pics

I was super lucky to find a trifasciata Whitney at a local Lowe’s. The Whitney stays a bit smaller and has solid deep green leaves. The borders of the plant are a variegated light greenish-gray. A lot like the Laurentii variety, but not yellow. And it also stays a bit smaller. I found this for $10!

Trifasciata Whitney variety
Trifasciata Whitney variety

6. Trifasciata zeylanica variety ID pics

Zeylanica is another somewhat rare variety that I don’t see too often. It looks a lot like the trifasciata. I’ve read a lot about zeylanica and think that a lot of them are probably mis-marked and are really trifasciata. Here’s one I saw labeled at a nursery in northern Virginia.

Trifasciata zeylanica plant

7. Trifasciata moonshine variety ID pics

I am absolutely obsessed with my trifasciata moonshine! I originally bought the cutting below off of Facebook for $10, but I have been seeing these pop up in nurseries over the last year. This variety has a gorgeous mint green color with very little variegation. The better the light on the plant, the lighter the color gets. Just stunning!

Trifasciata moonshine cutting
Trifasciata moonshine variety
Trifasciata moonshine variety

8. Trifasciata jaboa variety ID pics

The trifasciata jaboa is big and beautiful. Its leaves are tall, wide, and thick. They have a bit of an orangey-red tint to the borders, and they are highly variegated with a grayish-white and medium green. I saw this one for about 100 bucks at a nursery, and a friend of mine snagged a huge one at Home Depot recently for under $50.

Trifasciata jaboa plant

9. Trifasciata hahnii robusta variety ID pics

Now let’s talk about some hahnii varieties. Hahnii snake plants are also referred to as “birds nest” snake plants because they are shorter, stout, and grow more in clumps. The clumps are often very crowded together as you can see below.

The hahnii robusta, pictured below, is basically a lot like the trifasciata and trifasciata robusta, except is has the short, stout, and highly clumped “hahnii” characteristics.

Trifasciata hahnii robusta
Trifasciata hahnii robusta

10. Trifasciata “golden hahnii” variety ID pics

The “golden hahnii” is very similar to the robusta hahnii in its inner appearance. Appropriately named—when it’s mature, it is often more yellow than even green. But most of these plants are a mixture of yellow and green.

Trifasciata golden hahnii
Trifasciata golden hahnii

11. Trifasciata hahnii black gold variety ID pics

“Black gold” hahnii snake plants look very similar to “golden hahnii” varieties. The black gold variety, however, has a deep green interior—almost black sometimes. The borders are a golden yellow.

Trifasciata hahnii black gold

12. Trifasciata hahnii jade variety ID pics

The jade variety has a a deep coloring as the leaves mature. I have even seen the plant labeled as “black” since it can get very dark. This one does not have variegation, but it can have some color fading from dark to light as the plant grows.

Trifasciata hahnii jade variety
Trifasciata hahnii jade variety

13. Trifasciata hahnii night owl variety ID pics

The hahnii night owl is often confused with the moonshine. But since it’s a hahnii, it’s a totally different type of plant. The night owl also has a much lighter color, but unlike the moonshine, it has a border. The border has a big of a yellowish color, so it isn’t as true of a mint green as the moonshine is.

Trifasciata hahnii night owl variety ID pics
Trifasciata hahnii night owl vs. moonshine
Night owl vs. moonshine comparison
Trifasciata hahnii night owl variety ID pics

14. Trifasciata Bantel’s Sensation variety ID pics

Now onto a couple more rare and interesting varieties of snake plants before we move on to take stuff. The Bantel’s Sensation variety has tall, very thin leaves. The leaves are a mixture of the normal snake plant variegation and tall, thin stripes. Bantel’s Sensation is a grayish-silver and deep green. Truly stunning.

Trifasciata Bantel's Sensation variety ID pics
Trifasciata Bantel's Sensation variety ID pics
Trifasciata Bantel's Sensation variety ID pics
Trifasciata Bantel's Sensation variety ID pics

15. Trifasciata cylindrica variety ID pics

Cylindrica varieties look a lot like other snake plants in terms of their coloring and variegation. But the leaves are shaped like…you guessed it…cylinders. The cylinders have a pointy tip, and they have a somewhat rough surface. Here are a few different types of trifasciata cylindrica plants. I will be honest, not my favorite—but to each their own!

Trifasciata cylindrica variety ID pics
Trifasciata cylindrica variety ID pics
Trifasciata cylindrica variety ID pics

16. Hyacinthoides “grandis” variety ID pics

There are three more varieties of snake plants I want to spotlight that aren’t trifasciata. They are sansevierias (or dracaenas, or whatever), and the first is sansevieria hyacinthoides “grandis.” I bought mine at a local nursery and have found it’s a bit on the rare side. I bought it hoping it was a whale fin snake plant, but alas—just another big variety!

The leaves have a reddish-orange border, much like the jaboa variety (see above in this post). I loved seeing the two babies sprout up from this mother plant. It took almost a year, so it was all the more rewarding!

sansevieria hyacinthoides "grandis" variety ID pics
sansevieria hyacinthoides "grandis" variety ID pics
sansevieria hyacinthoides "grandis" variety ID pics

17. Sansevieria masoniana “whale fin” variety ID pics

The second non-trifasciata variety I want to spotlight is the sansevieria masoniana, aka the “whale fin snake plant.” Wanna know why they call it that? Because it’s freaking huge, like a whale’s fin. Here’s a huge one for $200 at a local nursery…and then below that, my little guy I got from a local person.

I also have a post all about how to care for a propagate whale fin snake plants specifically. I just love them that much 🙂

sansevieria masoniana whale fin snake plant
sansevieria masoniana whale fin snake plant
sansevieria masoniana whale fin snake plant

18. Sansevieria ehrenbergii “Samurai” variety ID pics

Here’s the last of the non-trifasciata varieties I want to spotlight: Sansevieria ehrenbergii, aka Samurai. These look a lot like cylindrical snake plants in some ways, but the unique shape give them a different feel. As the leaves grow, they create a fan shape. This is a very slow grower. But worth the wait—isn’t this cool looking?

Sansevieria ehrenbergii "Samurai" variety ID pics
Sansevieria ehrenbergii "Samurai" variety ID pics
Sansevieria ehrenbergii "Samurai" variety ID pics

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collage of snake plants with text that says 18 sansevieria varieties and photos

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