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My Tiny Backyard: Platform Deck & Some Cleaning Up (ORC Week 2)

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Hey all, I’m back for week 2 of the One Room Challenge and sharing the progress we’ve made on our tiny backyard.  Here’s week 1 if you missed it. Let’s jump right in.

One of the main projects we wanted to do in the backyard was clean up the area around the house with a platform deck. We settled on the platform deck for a few reasons:

  • A concrete patio was way too expensive
  • Landscaping the area around the house with gravel and pavers would be nice, but it wouldn’t create as clean and long-lasting of a solution as we were hoping for
  • We could match it with the deck that’s above it for a cohesive look
  • We could get the look of a clean, modern, and practical space without the cost of a concrete patio
  • My dad said he’d do it 🙂

As I’ve mentioned before, my dad is a licensed contractor, so he put in the deck. He whipped it out in a couple of days, working on it here and there between his real jobs for real customers who pay him real money. (Did I mention how much I love my dad? He’s the best.)

Here’s a reminder of how the spot looked before the deck:

My tiny yard: Before and plans

My tiny yard: Before and plans

My tiny yard: Before and plans

My tiny yard: Before and plans

My tiny yard: Before and plans

Having a professional do the deck was important to us because it is way too big of a project for us to DIY, and since it’s structural, we wanted it to be 100% legit. So to keep costs down, we chose to do it all with wood.

Just kidding. I was a bit of a brat about this one and wanted it to be finished with the same gray Trex we have on the second-story deck. Mike agreed. But hear me out, here…this stuff is beautiful, and while it’s more of an investment up front, it needs ZERO maintenance. No refinishing, staining, etc. And I absolutely love the clean, modern look of the gray Trex. I just swallowed the price tag on it, which was about 80% of the total materials cost.

(Note: Sharing the tutorial for the benches pictured here, but once I saw them with the gray Trex, I refinished them in a different color. More on that when I post the bench plans.)

Since our yard is on a bit of a slope, the deck has a small area where it is above the ground. Not enough to warrant steps, but enough to allow to cats to crawl under it. In fact, THE VERY FIRST TIME we had them out with the deck built but not finished, they crawled under. Looking forward to having dad wrap this project up—there are just a few things left he needs to do. Pics forthcoming.

The deck alone made a HUGE difference in cleaning up the yard, but to finish off this part of the yard, I wanted to do some landscaping around the air conditioning unit/general utilities area. We also didn’t want to leave any grass back in that weird corner to mow. This was a huge PITA because I had to pull up some of the sod and dig out the dirt. Way more work than I was expecting, but we think it turned out great.

Here’s a quick little tutorial on how we cleaned this area up.

Supplies

(This post contains affiliate links. You can read more about that here.)

Step 1: First we cleaned up the area. As a reminder, here’s what it looked like before. We used a shovel to cut and dig out some parts. We also dug up a bit of extra dirt so the rocks wouldn’t sit too high.

My tiny yard: Before and plans

My tiny yard: Before and plans

Step 2: Next we evened out the area. I actually did this while the dirt was wet after it had rained. While it was really messy, it was easy to mold the dirt and pack it down like clay.

Step 3: After we had an even space, we laid landscaping fabric cut to size and pinned it in place using landscaping pins.

Here’s some of the fabric laid.

Step 4: I laid a “L” shape of pavers (you’ll see why in an upcoming post) and then filled in the rest with rocks. Luckily we didn’t really need to edge off most of the area since the fence, house, and deck did most of that for us.

Since these drainage rocks came really dirty in the bag, I just gave them a good hosing off after dumping them in the spot. It cleaned them up nicely.

Also, the end of the rocky area where the rocks just kind of stop—we’re going to have garden beds butting up against that area, so it will look cleaner when those are in. One step at a time.

And then I finished the L-shaped screen for our utilities area. (This makes it sound like it was a quick and easy project. It was not, lol. See the full post for that project here!)

Once the beds are in to cap off the other side of the rocky area, we’ll be dumping a layer of prettier decorative stones over the parts you can see. No need to waste money on prettier stones that will be hidden behind this beauty:

Hi guys, it's week 3 of the One Room Challenge, and we're finishing up the AC/utilities corner part of the yard. Wahoo! Last week, I shared progress on the platform deck and some light rock landscaping. This week, I'm sharing the DIY AC unit screen I made. I'm going to share how I did it, but I'm not going to share a complete tutorial. It's unlikely that anyone (except my next door neighbor) has exactly the same layout and needs as we do. Here's what we used to make a DIY AC unit screen: (Affiliate links below. Thank you for your support!) 2x4s for the standing pieces 1x4s for the slats Random orbit sander Fine-frit sandpaper to polish by hand Saw, finish nailer Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive Varathane wood stain in Kona Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin Kreg Jig and 2.5" pocket hole screws And here's how we did it. (Remember to wear a mask and eye protection while sanding and working with wood, and wear an appropriate mask while working with stains and finishes. Follow the directions and warnings from your particular brand. Do not use any tools without proper training, precautions, and supervision. Read my full disclaimer here.) Step 1: First we measured how big we wanted the screen to be. We decided to shape it like an L and have it come up high enough to cover other utilities, not just the AC unit. (If you make a project like this, make sure it does not interfere with anything that requires air circulation or regular reading.) After deciding on measurements, and knowing we wanted each screen slat to be 1 inch apart, we calculated how much 1x4 we'd need. Once we had the final height (14 pieces of 1x4, each an inch apart), we cut the four pieces of 2x4 to height. (Yes, that's a diaper and a package of wipes in my purse. Times have changed.) Step 2: Next I gave each piece a quick sand using my random orbit sander. This was mostly to polish each piece up and break down any rough or splintery edges. After each piece was cleaned up, I wiped the whole lot down and stained each using the Varathane wood stain in Kona. I also drilled pocket holes in one of my 2x4s to create the main corner support (but didn't attach them yet). This, coupled with the next step, was by far the most time consuming. (But was faster using a small roller instead of a paint brush!) I was VERY GLAD at this point that I hadn't used 1x2 like I'd originally wanted. That would have been painful. Step 3: Once I had stained everything and it had dried according to my instructions, I gave each piece a few coats of the Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin. Oof, talk about a slow process. (See my post on how to stain and finish wood here.) And one that took over my garage for several days. Luckily the urethane dries in about 4 hours, so that helped me get two coats in on one day. Everything is dry...time to assemble. Yay! Step 4: We began working on the longer side of our L-shaped screen first. Board by board, we spaced and nailed using a finish nailer. (By we, I mean my dad, who came over with his finish nailer to help me complete this project. Ramona was up, so I held her while she watched from inside. She loves grandpappy.) We did a 3/4" overhang on the left side. You'll see why. Step 5: Once the longer side was done, we did the shorter side. For those, we did a 1.5" overhang on the right side. Step 6: We stood the screen up to make sure everything looked right. Now here's where the pocket holes came in handy. We attached each side to one another by driving 2.5" pocket hole screws through the pocket holes. Since we also built an overhang in on each side, the sides fit together perfectly. And here it is in place! It fits perfectly over the L shape of pavers we laid and is perfectly level. I am super pleased with how this one turned out. It may have been time consuming, but it was worth it! And it matches the outdoor table and benches I'll be sharing soon. PIC You can also see I decided to dress it up a bit with some Pot Clips and pots we had in the garage. I love these things. Like this? PIN IT!

Hi guys, it's week 3 of the One Room Challenge, and we're finishing up the AC/utilities corner part of the yard. Wahoo! Last week, I shared progress on the platform deck and some light rock landscaping. This week, I'm sharing the DIY AC unit screen I made. I'm going to share how I did it, but I'm not going to share a complete tutorial. It's unlikely that anyone (except my next door neighbor) has exactly the same layout and needs as we do. Here's what we used to make a DIY AC unit screen: (Affiliate links below. Thank you for your support!) 2x4s for the standing pieces 1x4s for the slats Random orbit sander Fine-frit sandpaper to polish by hand Saw, finish nailer Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive Varathane wood stain in Kona Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin Kreg Jig and 2.5" pocket hole screws And here's how we did it. (Remember to wear a mask and eye protection while sanding and working with wood, and wear an appropriate mask while working with stains and finishes. Follow the directions and warnings from your particular brand. Do not use any tools without proper training, precautions, and supervision. Read my full disclaimer here.) Step 1: First we measured how big we wanted the screen to be. We decided to shape it like an L and have it come up high enough to cover other utilities, not just the AC unit. (If you make a project like this, make sure it does not interfere with anything that requires air circulation or regular reading.) After deciding on measurements, and knowing we wanted each screen slat to be 1 inch apart, we calculated how much 1x4 we'd need. Once we had the final height (14 pieces of 1x4, each an inch apart), we cut the four pieces of 2x4 to height. (Yes, that's a diaper and a package of wipes in my purse. Times have changed.) Step 2: Next I gave each piece a quick sand using my random orbit sander. This was mostly to polish each piece up and break down any rough or splintery edges. After each piece was cleaned up, I wiped the whole lot down and stained each using the Varathane wood stain in Kona. I also drilled pocket holes in one of my 2x4s to create the main corner support (but didn't attach them yet). This, coupled with the next step, was by far the most time consuming. (But was faster using a small roller instead of a paint brush!) I was VERY GLAD at this point that I hadn't used 1x2 like I'd originally wanted. That would have been painful. Step 3: Once I had stained everything and it had dried according to my instructions, I gave each piece a few coats of the Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin. Oof, talk about a slow process. (See my post on how to stain and finish wood here.) And one that took over my garage for several days. Luckily the urethane dries in about 4 hours, so that helped me get two coats in on one day. Everything is dry...time to assemble. Yay! Step 4: We began working on the longer side of our L-shaped screen first. Board by board, we spaced and nailed using a finish nailer. (By we, I mean my dad, who came over with his finish nailer to help me complete this project. Ramona was up, so I held her while she watched from inside. She loves grandpappy.) We did a 3/4" overhang on the left side. You'll see why. Step 5: Once the longer side was done, we did the shorter side. For those, we did a 1.5" overhang on the right side. Step 6: We stood the screen up to make sure everything looked right. Now here's where the pocket holes came in handy. We attached each side to one another by driving 2.5" pocket hole screws through the pocket holes. Since we also built an overhang in on each side, the sides fit together perfectly. And here it is in place! It fits perfectly over the L shape of pavers we laid and is perfectly level. I am super pleased with how this one turned out. It may have been time consuming, but it was worth it! And it matches the outdoor table and benches I'll be sharing soon. PIC You can also see I decided to dress it up a bit with some Pot Clips and pots we had in the garage. I love these things. Like this? PIN IT!

Hi guys, it's week 3 of the One Room Challenge, and we're finishing up the AC/utilities corner part of the yard. Wahoo! Last week, I shared progress on the platform deck and some light rock landscaping. This week, I'm sharing the DIY AC unit screen I made. I'm going to share how I did it, but I'm not going to share a complete tutorial. It's unlikely that anyone (except my next door neighbor) has exactly the same layout and needs as we do. Here's what we used to make a DIY AC unit screen: (Affiliate links below. Thank you for your support!) 2x4s for the standing pieces 1x4s for the slats Random orbit sander Fine-frit sandpaper to polish by hand Saw, finish nailer Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive Varathane wood stain in Kona Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin Kreg Jig and 2.5" pocket hole screws And here's how we did it. (Remember to wear a mask and eye protection while sanding and working with wood, and wear an appropriate mask while working with stains and finishes. Follow the directions and warnings from your particular brand. Do not use any tools without proper training, precautions, and supervision. Read my full disclaimer here.) Step 1: First we measured how big we wanted the screen to be. We decided to shape it like an L and have it come up high enough to cover other utilities, not just the AC unit. (If you make a project like this, make sure it does not interfere with anything that requires air circulation or regular reading.) After deciding on measurements, and knowing we wanted each screen slat to be 1 inch apart, we calculated how much 1x4 we'd need. Once we had the final height (14 pieces of 1x4, each an inch apart), we cut the four pieces of 2x4 to height. (Yes, that's a diaper and a package of wipes in my purse. Times have changed.) Step 2: Next I gave each piece a quick sand using my random orbit sander. This was mostly to polish each piece up and break down any rough or splintery edges. After each piece was cleaned up, I wiped the whole lot down and stained each using the Varathane wood stain in Kona. I also drilled pocket holes in one of my 2x4s to create the main corner support (but didn't attach them yet). This, coupled with the next step, was by far the most time consuming. (But was faster using a small roller instead of a paint brush!) I was VERY GLAD at this point that I hadn't used 1x2 like I'd originally wanted. That would have been painful. Step 3: Once I had stained everything and it had dried according to my instructions, I gave each piece a few coats of the Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin. Oof, talk about a slow process. (See my post on how to stain and finish wood here.) And one that took over my garage for several days. Luckily the urethane dries in about 4 hours, so that helped me get two coats in on one day. Everything is dry...time to assemble. Yay! Step 4: We began working on the longer side of our L-shaped screen first. Board by board, we spaced and nailed using a finish nailer. (By we, I mean my dad, who came over with his finish nailer to help me complete this project. Ramona was up, so I held her while she watched from inside. She loves grandpappy.) We did a 3/4" overhang on the left side. You'll see why. Step 5: Once the longer side was done, we did the shorter side. For those, we did a 1.5" overhang on the right side. Step 6: We stood the screen up to make sure everything looked right. Now here's where the pocket holes came in handy. We attached each side to one another by driving 2.5" pocket hole screws through the pocket holes. Since we also built an overhang in on each side, the sides fit together perfectly. And here it is in place! It fits perfectly over the L shape of pavers we laid and is perfectly level. I am super pleased with how this one turned out. It may have been time consuming, but it was worth it! And it matches the outdoor table and benches I'll be sharing soon. PIC You can also see I decided to dress it up a bit with some Pot Clips and pots we had in the garage. I love these things. Like this? PIN IT!

This space already looks so different. Here’s a before and after because I like to see them as I go along (keeps me motivated)…

My tiny yard: Before and plans

Hi guys, it's week 3 of the One Room Challenge, and we're finishing up the AC/utilities corner part of the yard. Wahoo! Last week, I shared progress on the platform deck and some light rock landscaping. This week, I'm sharing the DIY AC unit screen I made. I'm going to share how I did it, but I'm not going to share a complete tutorial. It's unlikely that anyone (except my next door neighbor) has exactly the same layout and needs as we do. Here's what we used to make a DIY AC unit screen: (Affiliate links below. Thank you for your support!) 2x4s for the standing pieces 1x4s for the slats Random orbit sander Fine-frit sandpaper to polish by hand Saw, finish nailer Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive Varathane wood stain in Kona Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin Kreg Jig and 2.5" pocket hole screws And here's how we did it. (Remember to wear a mask and eye protection while sanding and working with wood, and wear an appropriate mask while working with stains and finishes. Follow the directions and warnings from your particular brand. Do not use any tools without proper training, precautions, and supervision. Read my full disclaimer here.) Step 1: First we measured how big we wanted the screen to be. We decided to shape it like an L and have it come up high enough to cover other utilities, not just the AC unit. (If you make a project like this, make sure it does not interfere with anything that requires air circulation or regular reading.) After deciding on measurements, and knowing we wanted each screen slat to be 1 inch apart, we calculated how much 1x4 we'd need. Once we had the final height (14 pieces of 1x4, each an inch apart), we cut the four pieces of 2x4 to height. (Yes, that's a diaper and a package of wipes in my purse. Times have changed.) Step 2: Next I gave each piece a quick sand using my random orbit sander. This was mostly to polish each piece up and break down any rough or splintery edges. After each piece was cleaned up, I wiped the whole lot down and stained each using the Varathane wood stain in Kona. I also drilled pocket holes in one of my 2x4s to create the main corner support (but didn't attach them yet). This, coupled with the next step, was by far the most time consuming. (But was faster using a small roller instead of a paint brush!) I was VERY GLAD at this point that I hadn't used 1x2 like I'd originally wanted. That would have been painful. Step 3: Once I had stained everything and it had dried according to my instructions, I gave each piece a few coats of the Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin. Oof, talk about a slow process. (See my post on how to stain and finish wood here.) And one that took over my garage for several days. Luckily the urethane dries in about 4 hours, so that helped me get two coats in on one day. Everything is dry...time to assemble. Yay! Step 4: We began working on the longer side of our L-shaped screen first. Board by board, we spaced and nailed using a finish nailer. (By we, I mean my dad, who came over with his finish nailer to help me complete this project. Ramona was up, so I held her while she watched from inside. She loves grandpappy.) We did a 3/4" overhang on the left side. You'll see why. Step 5: Once the longer side was done, we did the shorter side. For those, we did a 1.5" overhang on the right side. Step 6: We stood the screen up to make sure everything looked right. Now here's where the pocket holes came in handy. We attached each side to one another by driving 2.5" pocket hole screws through the pocket holes. Since we also built an overhang in on each side, the sides fit together perfectly. And here it is in place! It fits perfectly over the L shape of pavers we laid and is perfectly level. I am super pleased with how this one turned out. It may have been time consuming, but it was worth it! And it matches the outdoor table and benches I'll be sharing soon. PIC You can also see I decided to dress it up a bit with some Pot Clips and pots we had in the garage. I love these things. Like this? PIN IT!

And here’s a recap of the to-do list. I’m bolding what’s on my radar next…

  • Build a platform deck (not DIY—having a licensed contractor do it to make sure it’s done right)
  • Add additional lighting—hanging? string? No idea.
  • Clean up area around the AC unit and the gas meter/gutter using rocks
  • Build table and benches for deck (Done, actually. Just need to finish them off with some no-slip bottoms because the Trex is very slick.)
  • Build screen for AC unit and all of those wires and boxes back there
  • Hang plants
  • Build veggie beds and lattice for climbing veggies
  • Hang bucket swing for Ramona
  • General landscaping around the fence perimeter (flowers, bushes, etc)
  • Maybe: Privacy screening for the deck area (depending on the cost, and I don’t think I want to DIY this)
  • Major maybe: Let myself do a little shopping for some fun items like a large outdoor vase planter—budget depending

I removed “add a rain barrel” because we decided against it based on space. I’d really like one, I just can’t find something that works well for the space.

Like this? PIN IT!

DIY rock landscaping around AC unit

See the finished backyard post here ?

Modern design ideas for a small backyard // DIY rock landscaping around a gray Trex platform deck // Hanging herbs // DIY outdoor cat perches // DIY HVAC unit screen // small garden ideas // hanging ferns on a patio



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My tiny yard: Before and plans
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My Tiny Backyard: Before and Plans (ORC Week 1)
Hi guys, it's week 3 of the One Room Challenge, and we're finishing up the AC/utilities corner part of the yard. Wahoo! Last week, I shared progress on the platform deck and some light rock landscaping. This week, I'm sharing the DIY AC unit screen I made. I'm going to share how I did it, but I'm not going to share a complete tutorial. It's unlikely that anyone (except my next door neighbor) has exactly the same layout and needs as we do. Here's what we used to make a DIY AC unit screen: (Affiliate links below. Thank you for your support!) 2x4s for the standing pieces 1x4s for the slats Random orbit sander Fine-frit sandpaper to polish by hand Saw, finish nailer Liquid Nails Heavy Duty Construction Adhesive Varathane wood stain in Kona Minwax Helmsman Spar Urethane in Satin Kreg Jig and 2.5
Next
Hide Your AC Unit With a DIY HVAC Unit Screen

Joy

Tuesday 17th of April 2018

The gravel around the air conditioning unit was such a great idea and I love the privacy screen you made for it. The decking color is beautiful! What a difference already - can't wait to see the next post!

Alison

Monday 16th of April 2018

I love the gray trex, and good job on your solution for hiding the a/c!

Lindi

Monday 16th of April 2018

You made some great progress! I LOVE the grey Trex! It's so nice - I would definitely pay more up front for something that functional and pretty. Also, we still have inches of snow on the ground.... lol. Guess I'll never do the backyard for a spring ORC...

Brittany Goldwyn

Monday 16th of April 2018

You live in the north pole! But my in-laws here in Minnesota just got almost two feet of snow yesterday, sooo

Maureen

Sunday 15th of April 2018

I love the screen you have added to hide the air conditioner and utility meters! The clean lines really compliment the clean lines of the Trex. All the hard work has made a huge difference!

Ruthie

Sunday 15th of April 2018

The deck looks great! I really like how you hid your air conditioner too! Looking good!

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