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How to Mix & Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

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This post shares all about how to mix and match multiple Infusible Ink transfer sheets. Have you used Cricut’s Infusible Ink before and now you’re ready to step up your skills by doing something a little more complicated? Try creating designs using different patterns and colors.

How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

Hey guys! I’m back with some more Infusible Ink content—this time talking all about how to mix and match multiple Infusible Ink transfer sheets. If you’re brand new to Cricut’s Infusible Ink, make sure you check out the first two posts I did on the material: how to use Cricut Infusible Ink on coasters and how to create a personalized reusable tote bag using Infusible Ink.

Both posts are very detailed and include just about everything you need to get started working with Infusible Ink. They also include some tips and pictures of the most likely issues you might encounter working with this material—and how to avoid them.

How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

Recap: What is Cricut’s Infusible Ink?

A quick recap for those of you who missed the first two posts. Wondering what Infusible Ink actually is? In a nutshell, it’s an ink-based heat transfer product. The ink comes in a solid state on a transfer sheet (in lots of beautiful colors and patterns). You then transfer it to a blank material (a shirt, for example) using heat. 

The heat turns the solid-state ink into a gas and infuses it into the material. So, unlike iron-on or heat transfer vinyl, which sits on top of a material using adhesive, Infusible Ink becomes part of the base material. This process creates professional-looking, permanent, and extremely vibrant designs.

infusible ink plant themed coasters
personalized reusable bag

Impressed? Me too! I love this stuff. It’s fun to work with, and I’ve really been enjoying working with the different blanks and transfer sheets. Cricut recently released a bunch of new colors and patterns, and each one I’ve tried is stunning. So let’s chat about how to mix and match multiple Infusible Ink transfer sheets to create beautiful one-of-a-kind designs on a kids t-shirt. 

HERE’S WHAT I USED

And here’s how to mix and match multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets.

Note: When working with Infusible Ink, it’s best to use the Cricut-brand blanks. However, if you’d like to experiment with other types of blanks, just make sure they are polymer or polyester-based blanks. This is the material required to create a permanent bond between the ink and the fibers. Don’t use 100% cotton.

matte black cricut explore air 2

Step 1: Prep your design and cut your transfer sheets

First I created my design and decided what patterns and colors I wanted to use for each part. I decided to use a dark galaxy-themed pattern from this sampler for the text and the rocket ship. For the stars and the fire part of the rocket, I used parts of the bright pink/yellow/orange gradient transfer sheet in this sampler.

You can download the cut file I used in this project using the form below!

To minimize transfer sheet waste, I cut pieces as closely as possible to the size I needed. You don’t want to waste this stuff—it’s pricey! Then I positioned the elements on the mockup design space mat accordingly.

Before you begin cutting, make sure you mirror all of your designs. The transfer paper material should also be positioned on the cutting mat with the liner side facing down. The side that looks and feels like paper should be facing up. 

Note: If you’re on an Explore machine like I am, make sure to turn your machine’s dial to “custom” first. Then select Infusible Ink Transfer Sheet in Design Space. If you’re on a Maker, proceed as usual with selecting your material.

Weeding the transfer sheets is pretty easy. I don’t really even use the weeding too because the negative material comes off so easily. I do, however, use tweezers.

cricut infusible ink transfer sheets

Step 2: Prep blank kids shirt

To prep the blank youth t-shirt, heat your EasyPress up to the temperature outlined in Cricut’s Heat Guide. For this project, it was 385 degrees Fahrenheit. Then put your shirt on the EasyPress mat and preheat the entire application area.

This step is critical because it removes wrinkles and moisture that may be in the garment. Both can interfere with the ink transfer process. Then let the shirt cool completely. While it’s cooling, you can slide your cardstock sheet into the shirt (I actually used a piece of paper because I didn’t have any cardstock).

You can also use a lint roller to clean off the application area on the shirt. Even if you don’t see any lint, you still want to do this. Lint can also interfere with the transfer process because it can take colors differently. 

youth t-shirt compatible blank
plain t-shirt ready for heat press

Want more Cricut? Check out my guide to using the Cricut Maker Knife Blade, how to slice text in Cricut Design Space, my EasyPress 2 guide, my Explore Air 2 review, my tips for working with holographic mosaic iron-on, my debossing and engraving tip tutorial, and my tutorial for the EasyPress Mini and using iron-on with wood! Also check out my free cut file gallery and the latest project for my printer stand and storage for my Cricut machines!

Step 3: Position design, prep butcher paper, and transfer

Because starting this step, make sure your t-shirt has cooled completely. If it hasn’t, the ink could begin transferring while you are positioning it, resulting in a yucky “ghosting” effect. Once cool, position the different pieces of you design and press down firmly to keep them in place. You can use heat-resistant tape if you need to.

Cut a piece of butcher paper that is larger than the EasyPress’s heat plate. Butcher paper comes with the transfer sheets. Then place to paper over the design. I like to mark the edges of the design on the butcher paper with a pen—especially if it’s about the same size as the heat plate.

This is because I want to make sure I do not miss any part of the design and so I don’t shift the EasyPress at all after I set it down. This can cause ghosting or smudge the design. I transferred the design for 40 seconds using light pressure at 385 degrees Fahrenheit. 

Note: Keep things as still as possible while making your transfer. Moving during the transfer process will likely mess up your design. Apply pressure from above and don’t move a muscle!

How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
butcher paper
EasyPress 2
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

Step 4: Reveal the “girls can do anything” design

Slowly lift your EasyPress. The butcher paper will probably come off when you do this, but let your design chill for a few. Once it’s cool, use tweezers to reveal the different pieces of your design.

I really love how the different colors and patterns turns out. Much more interesting than just using one transfer sheet, no matter how pretty they are!

How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

removing infusible ink transfer sheet
removing infusible ink transfer sheet
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

Care tip: To care for the shirt, wash inside out. You can tumble dry these as well. Avoid fabric softeners, dryer sheets, and bleach.

How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets

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How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets
How to Mix and Match Multiple Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets


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