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How to Make Baked Bath Salts

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This post shares all about how to make baked bath salts. This homemade bath salts recipe is the perfect thing to spoil yourself or give to a friend as a gift! This project is featured in a roundup of my 10 best DIY beauty gifts.

How to make the absolute best homemade bath salts

I absolutely love bath salts. In the past I’ve posted tutorials for making rainbow bath salts and for making a stress-relieving lavender-magnesium bath soak, but I’ve never posted a tutorial about baking plain old bath salts. Sometimes simple is best, though.

And with the holidays coming up, this simple DIY is a great go-to gift if you’re looking for something thoughtful, easy to make, and affordable. Baked bath salts make a great gift for yourself, too. I love a good soak and go through them so quickly that making them in bulk is worthwhile.

How do I keep my bath salts from clumping?

So why bake bath salts? Well, you don’t really have to. You can just mix some stuff up in a bag and trow it under the sink cabinet. But your finished bath salts will have oils in them, which will lead to some clumping after a while. Baking your mixture of salts, baking soda, and oils will help it stay clump-free and looking fresh.

This is particularly important if you’re giving the salts as a gift and want them to look more professional. Or baking them well in advance and they’ll be sitting for a while. It’s an easy process that really helps the salts look polished. So let’s get started.

homemade baked bath salts

Here’s what I used:

And here’s how I made my baked bath salts:

(Don’t use any ingredients you’re allergic to, and always spot test new ingredients to make sure you don’t have a reaction to them. Do not use any homemade products without consulting with an appropriate medical professional first. If you’re looking for a recipe to sell, make sure you consult with a professional first. Read my full terms of use here.)

Step 1: Mix dry ingredients and oils

First I mixed the Epsom salt, sea salt, and baking soda in a bowl. I added the sweet almond oil, essential oils for scent, and stirred. I actually used a much bigger bowl for this; the bowl below is just for illustrative purposes. I found it was helpful to use a whisk or fork to crush out stubborn clumps.

Step 2: Add food coloring

Next I added the food coloring. A little bit goes a long way. Remember that you can always add more color to deepen it, but you can’t take it away. Mix well as you’re adding the drops.

mixing bath salts in a bowl
mixing bath salts in a bowl

Step 3: Bake on a baking pan

After I was done mixing, I covered a baking pan with foil and spread the dyed salt mixture evenly over the foil. I used two layers of foil to help ensure I didn’t rip through it in the next step. Then I popped it in the oven for about 15 minutes at 175 degrees Fahrenheit. This is as low as my oven goes.

baked bath salts on a tray
baked bath salts on a tray
baked bath salts on a tray

Step 4: Stir and mix occasionally as you’re baking

Every 5 minutes, I took the pan out and gently mixed the salts with a spoon. This is why I use two sheets of aluminum foil—one might rip. I also used a wooden spoon to help prevent ripping.

The stirring process just helps the salts dry evenly so they don’t clump. When 15 minutes have passed, take the pan out of the oven and let the salts cool completely, mixing them as they cool. Once they’ve cooled completely, I store in air-tight containers.

wooden spoon with baked bath salts

Important!

Let your salts sit out over night before packaging them, even after they’ve cooled. One good idea is to put them in a jar, and then instead of putting a lid on them, cover the opening with plastic wrap. Then poke holes in the plastic wrap so the salts can off-gas. You can also store in open plastic baggies over night after they have cooled completely.

colored bath salts on a table

Here’s my sampler lineup…

colored bath salts on a table

Homemade baked bath salts FAQs

Making baking bath salts is a pretty easy process, but there are a few issues you might encounter and things to keep in mind. Here they are.

Why are my bath salts wet?

I don’t add any water to my bath salts, but adding oils can lead to wet bath salts. Especially depending on how much oil you want to use in your recipe. Baking is a way to prevent the salts from becoming wet and clumpy.

Keeping your finished salts in an air-tight, dry space also helps to keep them dry. You are probably storing your homemade bath salts in your bathroom, which is a naturally more humid area of your home. So an airtight container helps to prevent that extra humidity from making your bath salts wet.

baked bath salts in a bowl

Check out my 10 easiest DIY beauty gifts post, my DIY eucalyptus and lavender salt scrub, my homemade honey and beeswax lip balm, and my DIY peppermint sugar scrub!

How do I keep bath salts from hardening?

This is also related to moisture. When moisture gets into the bath salts, they will dissolve just slightly and begin to clump together. Sadly this is just something that can happen with bath salts—even store bought bath salts. I usually just shake them up and it gets rid of the clumping.

But you can help prevent clumping from the get-go by baking your bath salts to eliminate excess moisture. And store them in a dry, air-tight container.

What does baking soda do in bath salts?

Baking soda does an awesome job of helping to soften your skin. I loved putting a bit in Ramona’s bath when she was a baby and had any skin irritations. In bath salts, baking soda helps with your overall skin health.

colored bath salts on a table

What kind of food color should I use for my baked bath salts?

It doesn’t matter. Just remember that whatever you use, less is more at first. You can always add more coloring if you need to deepen the color, but a little goes a long way. I love this food coloring set because the colors are vibrant and mix very well.

Yield: A Sampler of 4 Different Bath Salts

BAKED BATH SALTS

Make Baked Bath Salts

How to make baked bath salts. This homemade bath salts recipe is the perfect thing to spoil yourself or give to a friend as a gift!

Materials

Instructions

    1. Mix the Epsom salt, sea salt, and baking soda in a bowl. Add the oils and stir.
    2. Add the food coloring. A little bit goes a long way. Remember that you can always add more color to deepen the color, but you can't take it away. Mix well as you're adding the drops.
    3. Cover a baking pan with foil and spread the dyed salt mixture evenly over the foil. Use two layers of foil to help ensure you don't rip through it in the next step.
    4. Pop it in the oven for about 15 minutes at 175 degrees Fahrenheit.
    5. Every 5 minutes, take the pan out and gently mix the salts with a wooden spoon.
    6. When 15 minutes have passed, take the pan out of the oven and let the salts cool completely, mixing them as they cool. Once they've cooled completely, store in air-tight containers.
    7. That's it!

Notes

Let your salts sit out over night before packaging them, even after they've cooled. One good idea is to put them in a jar, and then instead of putting a lid on them, cover the opening with plastic wrap. Then poke holes in the plastic wrap so the salts can off-gas. You can also store in open plastic baggies over night after they have cooled completely.

Pin my tutorial about how to make baked bath salts!

How to make baked bath salts pinnable graphic with text overlay
How to make baked bath salts pinnable graphic with text overlay
How to make baked bath salts pinnable graphic with text overlay
How to make baked bath salts pinnable graphic with text overlay
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Maria

Sunday 20th of August 2017

Hello, I read you put them in a plastic bag when getting a container. Can I leave them in a plastic bag if the bag is sealed shut? Or does it HAVE to be in a container with lid?

Cherie

Saturday 8th of July 2017

Thanks for the suggestion, I am going to try it but I am wondering if heating the essential oils would affect the therapeutic benefits of them?

Tina

Tuesday 7th of March 2017

Hi! I'm excited to try this recipe! Other times I've made bath salts with baking soda, I've had the baking soda bits floating in the bath...does the baking of the salts fix this issue?

Brittany Goldwyn

Tuesday 7th of March 2017

Yikes, I've never had that happen. It sounds like maybe the baking soda was getting clumpy with any oils you may have added? I hope this recipe doesn't do that!

Alexis

Sunday 15th of January 2017

I am new to making bath salts. Why the almond oil if you don't mind me asking.

Brittany Goldwyn

Sunday 15th of January 2017

Hi Alexis! I just like to add a bit of extra oil so that the salts aren't super dry. I also use almond oil in my salt scrubs.

Sandy

Friday 14th of October 2016

Do you loose a whole lot of the scent when you make the salt?

Brittany Merth

Friday 14th of October 2016

I did not! I baked them on the lowest heat possible. If you need to add a few drops of scent after you bake them, that's fine. A few drops is such a small amount, not enough to make it clumpy, and is still quite potent.

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