Skip to Content

Quick Tip: Drive Pocket Hole Screws in Tight Places

Disclosure: This content may contain affiliate links. See my full terms of use here.

Stumped about how to drive pocket hole screws in tight places? Is your drill is too big and your pocket hole bit too long? Try a right angle drill attachment as a solution to reach pocket holes in hard-to-reach areas. This post also contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support!

Drive Pocket Hole Screws in Tight Places

Time for another quick tip post! I vowed to do these more often, and I only make good on that promise to do these more often, and I only make good on that promise sometimes…so let’s focus on the times I come through like a champ. Like today.

I’m going to share a quick tip about how to drive pocket hole screws in tight places using a right angle attachment for your drill. I’ve also got a quick video at the end of this post illustrating the pocket hole dilemma and how you can get around it. 🙂

How to Drive Pocket Hole Screws in Tight Places

Here’s the quick vid showing you how the right-angle drill attachment helps drive pocket hole screws in tight places:

Wait, what are pocket holes?

Let’s back up a sec. If you’re a for-fun woodworker like I am and you like building things for around your house, chances are you have a KregJig. (Get one if you don’t have one. I have a KregJig K4 and I use it to death. See my post with a slew of free projects that use pocket hole joinery.)

A KregJig is a super easy solution for drilling pocket holes in pieces of wood to create a super strong joint. You can check out some pocket holes in action halfway through my DIY plywood planter with hairpin legs project:

Modern DIY plywood planter with hairpin legs

Since you drill pocket holes into the wood, you need a longer bit to get your screw in. The pocket hole bit that came with my KregJig K4 looks like this. It attaches to the drill just like any other bit and is long with a square tip.

If you place pocket holes strategically, you can hide them and create a seamless, screw-free, nail-free surface on your projects. What’s not to love?

Modern DIY plywood planter with hairpin legs

Well, I don’t love it when I’m 90% of the way done with my project and realize that there are a few pocket holes I can’t reach. 

Well, I don’t love it when I’m 90% of the way done with my project and realize that there are a few pocket holes I can’t reach. 

For example, the plywood planter above had this problem. Once I’d assembled three sides and was ready to assemble the last side, I realized my drill and the long pocket hole bit wouldn’t fit down into the planter. UGH. 

I, like an idiot, thought that some pocket holes were just a lost cause. They were not to be reached and my project was ruined. So I threw it in the garbage.

Using a Right Angle Drill Attachment To Reach Pocket Holes

Just kidding, I did a little research and found that I can use a right angle drill attachment to drive pocket hole screws in tight spaces. And it was like $15 bucks at Home Depot! Hashtag winning, or whatever people are saying now.

Right angle drill attachment to reach pocket holes in tight spaces
Modern DIY plywood planter with hairpin legs

Here’s an example of the tight pocket hole dilemma on a build I’m working now. There are two pocket holes in the back that my drill can’t reach. 

One is visible here—circled in red with the big ol’ arrow pointing to it.

How to Drive Pocket Hole Screws in Tight Places
Right angle drill attachment to reach pocket holes in tight spaces
Right angle drill attachment to reach pocket holes in tight spaces
Pocket hole bit too long to reach pocket holes in tight spaces
How to Drive Pocket Hole Screws in Tight Places

Pop on the right-angle attachment, and suddenly my reach knows no bounds. Well, probably some bounds, but those bounds are beyond the scope of this project. So that’s it. If you find yourself in a pickle with some pocket holes that are hard to reach, get thee a right-angle drill attachment and show that project who’s boss. 



Comment spam is the worst.

And it's why I had to turn off comments on my posts that are older than a few weeks. However, I want to know if you have a question! You can hop over to my Instagram or Facebook pages and leave a comment or send me a direct message. Thank you for visiting and reading!

—————

This blog's content is for entertainment purposes only and is not professional advice. By reading this blog and attempting to re-create any content shared on it, you assume all responsibility. Read my full Terms of Use  here. Be safe out there!

Modern design ideas for a small backyard // My Tiny Backyard // by Brittany Goldwyn
Previous
How to Hang Flower Pots
Next
Easy Outdoor DIY Projects
shares